Skip to main content

About your Search

20130218
20130218
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
prime ministers questions. next, a senate hearing with u.s. central command nominee general lloyd austin. then the state of the indian nation speech by the president of the national congress of american indians. and a senate hearing on the implementation of the dodd-frank regulations for financial institutions. >> what worries me is that i do not want to be sitting in the same place i was a couple of years ago, going to the government and saying, this -- i want to see spectrum management that is much more market-driven. things like incentive options oakley will continue to work. the commission given flexibility to existing licensees. the secondary market working in a smoother way than it does now. >> you look at the growth rate in data usage from subscribers, we're seeing anywhere from 30%- 50% on an annual basis. there is no slowing down. there is this insatiable hunger for capacity, faster speeds, and they have a long feature in being able to provide that service. onmore from this year's ces monday night on the communicators at 8 pm eastern on cspan 2. >> general lloyd austin has been
in the u.s. ia, the united states information agency, and he wrote the screenplay for the memorial film about jfk, the man who fought a lot about american history. he disagreed with my approach from the get go. well before the controversies of bringing in john d.. he said every president has a right to a watering hole. there are all those who admires him who can go and speak and not have to worry about the judgment of history. if it is ahat's true private facility. but the minute you make it belic, i think it can't published--- cannot be governed by those rules. again, i don't think the public recognizes that it has a choice. if you go to the different presidential libraries, you'll find this among them are shrines and others are places of serious discussion. the harry truman, for example, is a place of serious discussion. the johnson library is redoing its museum. i haven't seen it yet, but i suspect it will be a place for serious discussion. and there are others that are not. i think the public needs to figure out what they want. " your office is and what -- >> your office is in what
had iraqi security forces? unit the brigade and you had u.s. forces working as a team. i think i'd have been your idea. it was working so well. basically paramilitary forces that are kurd and now you see a shooting war about to iraq and the traditional iraqi security forces. he told me between 5000 people between the article and 40 boundary line, but to keep tensions. >> dear member telling me we were blind inciter insult away from these guys shooting each other and reach of a file at first keep low? >> is my cessna commissary. what you see now is the blood for all us a story last week about how close they come to firing at each other over the oil problems. so now, i want to introduce into the record the exchange i had the general dempsey and general osten in 2010 and 11 about what happened in iraq. >> without objection. >> now let's move to afghanistan. that's not my intent, but i think it's only fair to the committee that you talk to general allen. pick up the phone, i know he families. you reach one of the finest officers to the other served with. you all have been out this fo
&a," with the former director of the nixon library. on the next "washington journal," talking about second terms of u.s. presidents, and the congressional research service representative discusses former presidents of the united states, including pensions and presidential libraries. "washington journal," at 7:00 a.m. on c-span. >> i think the women themselves in many cases were interested in politics but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives, so they were attracted to men who were going to become politically active or were already politically active. >> what i find intriguing is probably half of them, historically, i think half of these women would be unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> this president's day, c-span airs its new series. historians, chiefs of staff, curators, and others exploring the ladies who served as first lady, from martha washington to michelle obama. season one begins monday night on c-span, c-span radio, and c- span.org. and watch the program live at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> british prime minister david cameron talked about the horse meat sca
," douglas brinkley talks about the second terms of u.s. presidents. wendy ginsburg from the congressional research service discusses the benefits of former presidents of the united states, including pensions, offices, and libraries. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> british prime minister david cameron talk with members of the house of commons on wednesday. to go slaughterhouses have been rated since the inquiry began last month he also discusses the european economy and the budget code. this is just over 30 minutes >> mr. speaker? the horse meat scandal has undermined confidence in the safety of the food we eat, but threatens a very successful wheat industry. can the prime minister assured me that this government will follow every lead until each individual person or business responsible for any criminal or fraudulent act has been caught, exposed, prosecuted, and then expelled from ever again having any part in the u.k. food industry >> i fully support what the honorable gentleman said. let me join me in praising this constable. she kept people sit in the commu
of america put out a piece, talking about the u.s. celebrating president's day. it first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the february 22nd birthday of george washington, the first u.s. president. joe in maryland, democrat, hi. caller: my favorit would have to have been bill clinton. there are so many to choose from. i was very young. it was in high school at the time. he put into place a lot of laws that allow for people like me to go to college. beyond that, he was just incredibly involved in science necessarily see a lot of a a lot of presidents do now. host: from oklahoma, an independent caller. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for
a u.s. senator for a few years, but she and the girls had stayed in chicago where her whole family and support work. the bush people were incredibly helpful and generous about what the office was like and the structure and all that. the bushes were as well, personally, when the obama is visited. but i have to say there's just no substitute for being there. mrs. obama and the family were first at the adams hotel and then the blair house and into the white house for coffee, as is the tradition on inauguration morning. and everyone went off to the inauguration, and then what the white house residence staff does is just unbelievable, where in that time when the inauguration is going on, in this case they move the bushes out and the obamas in. they walk in, and now they live in this new home. it is really quite startling, and i don't think there's any amount of preparation that can help one understand what this all means. >> can you tell us about the bush is coming in, and then gary can tell us from the viewpoint of running the whole operation how that transition works. >> i was not her
tomorrow, a look at the role of the business community in higher education. that is from the u.s. chamber of commerce in washington. among the speakers, the educational secretary in george w. bush's second term. > host: we take a look at how your taxpayer dollars are being spent. on this presidents day, we will focus on presidents and what sort of benefits they get after they leave office. let's begin with a history. when did taxpayers start paying for these benefits for presidents after they leave office? guest: the act was enacted in 1958. the idea occurred around 1912. andrew carnegie decided he wanted to use his foundation to pay about $25,000 a year in pensions to former presidents. the first former president that would have been able to use that $25,000 happened to be his friend taft. taft did not need the money. he was a professor at yale. he became the supreme court justice. he had to walk a delicate balance of telling his friend thanks but no thanks and decided not to accept it. andrew carnegie and never articulated why he wanted to pay the pension. members of congress thought it
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)